Access to Justice Research

Supportive Housing For Returning Prisoners: Outcomes and Impacts of the Returning Home-Ohio Project 

Jocelyn Fontaine, Douglas Gilchrist-Scott, John Roman, Samuel Taxy, Caterina Gouvis Roman

August 2012

This evaluation of a supportive housing reentry pilot project, "Returning Home-Ohio", yielded positive outcomes for program participants. The pilot project, developed jointly by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction and the Corporation for Supportive Housing, was designed for disabled prisoners returning from state prison to five Ohio cities.

Still Serving Time: Struggling with Homelessness, Incarceration, and Re-entry in Baltimore

Health Care for the Homeless
October 2011

This study evaluates the costs of incarceration and recidivism, the connection between homelessness and incarceration, re-entry planning, and the services needed and available to people experiencing homelessness. Researchers surveyed 429 people in Baltimore...

Homes Not Handcuffs: The Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and The National Coalition for the Homeless
July 2009

This joint report by the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (NLCHP) and the National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH) tracks a growing trend in U.S. cities - the criminalization of homelessness. The report focuses on specific city measures from 2007 and 2008 ...

Assessing Criminal History as a Predictor of Future Housing Success for Homeless Adults With Behavioral Health Disorders

Daniel K. Malone
February 2009

Homeless adults with serious mental illnesses and chronic substance abuse problems have few housing options, a problem compounded when a criminal background is present. This study compared the criminal backgrounds and other characteristics of homeless individuals who succeeded in housing (retained housing continuously for two years) and those who failed in ...

Homelessness in the State and Federal Prison Population

Greg A. Greenberg and Robert A. Rosenheck
March 27, 2008

This study sought to investigate the rates and correlates of homelessness (i.e., living on the street or in a homeless shelter) among US adult state and federal prison inmates (ASFPIs). Data from a national survey of ASFPIs based on a random sampling survey (N = 17,565) were used to compare the homelessness rate among AFSPIs with that ...

Closing a Front Door to Homelessness among Veterans

James McGuire
June 2007

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has been identified as a mainstream institution to help prevent homelessness among America’s veterans. The large numbers of incarcerated veterans with serious mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders who are at risk for homelessness support the need for expanded VA outreach to this population...

Intensive Case Management as a Jail Diversion Program for People with a Serious Mental Illness

David Loveland and Michael Boyle
April 2007

This article reviews the research on intensive case management (ICM) programs as a jail diversion intervention for people with a serious mental illness (SMI). The review includes two types of ICM programs...

Understanding the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry

Amy L. Solomon, Christy Visher, Nancy G. La Vigne, and  Jenny Osborne
March 2006

The four-fold increase in incarceration rates in America over the past 25 years has had far reaching consequences. In 2003 alone, more than 656,000 state and federal prisoners returned to communities across the country, affecting public safety, public health, economic and community well-being, and family ...

A Dream Denied: The Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and The National Coalition for the Homeless
January 2006

The housing and homelessness crisis in the United States has worsened in 2005, with many cities reporting an increase in demands for emergency shelter.  In 2005, 71 percent of the 24 cities surveyed by the U.S. Conference of Mayors reported a 6 percent increase in requests for ...

Taking Stock: Housing, Homelessness and Prisoner Reentry

Caterina Gouvis Roman and Jeremy Travis
March 2004

This report, "Taking Stock: Housing, Homelessness, and Prisoner Reentry," examines how those who have spent time in prison or jail fare in securing safe and affordable housing following their release and discusses housing programming and practice designed to assist them. Every prisoner facing discharge from a correctional institution must ...

An Empirical Portrait of the Youth Reentry Population

Howard N. Snyder
January 2004

Nearly 100,000 juvenile offenders are released annually from custody facilities following adjudication or conviction, arguably all candidates for reentry programs. Their numbers increased substantially over the 1990s. These youth have spent a great proportion of their teenage years in custody. Most are male, minority, and nonviolent offenders. About half lived ...

Criminal history as a prognostic indicator in the treatment of homeless people with severe mental illness

James F. McGuire
2004

This study examined the clinical problems and treatment outcomes of homeless people with severe mental illness and a history of incarceration. Clients with a long-term incarceration history had higher psychiatric symptom scores, higher drug use and alcohol use scores...

An Empirical Portrait of the Youth Re-Entry Population

Howard N. Synder
2004

Nearly 100,000 juvenile offenders are released annually from custody facilities following adjudication or conviction, arguably all candidates for reentry programs. Their numbers increased substantially over the 1990s...

From Prison to Home: The Dimensions and Consequences of Prisoner Reentry

Jeremy Travis, Amy L. Soloman, and Michele Waul
June 2001

“From Prison to Home: The Dimensions and Consequences of Prisoner Reentry” examines the challenges of reintegrating individuals who leave prison and return home – challenges that are felt differently by different sectors of society.  Every day in the United Sates, nearly 1,600 men and women leave prison. The ...

A SAMHSA Research Initiative Assessing the Effectiveness of Jail Diversion Programs for Mentally Ill

Henry J. Steadman, Ph.D., Martha Williams Deane, M.A., Joseph P. Morrissey, Ph.D., Mary L. Westcott, Ph.D., Susan Salasin and Steven Shapiro
December 1999

For nearly 30 years, jail diversion programs have had wide support as a way to prevent people with mental illnesses and substance use disorders from unnecessarily entering the criminal justice system by providing more appropriate ...

Homeless and Non-Homeless Arrestees: Distinctions in Prevalence and in Sociodemographic, Drug Use, and Arrest Characteristics across DUF Sites, Final Report
Richard Spieglman
1999

The study hypothesized that homeless persons would be arrested more often for less serious crimes than housed persons and would be more likely to be involved with drugs, but not receiving drug treatment. The rates of homeless arrestees were much higher than the rates of homelessness for the communities where arrestees lived...
 

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