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05/21/2015 - Youth Counts COUNT!

By Coco Auerswald

On Wednesday, April 29, I had the honor of representing our We Count, California! team at two historic events in Washington, DC—a Senate hearing and a White House briefing—both focused on the Administration’s goal of ending youth homelessness by 2020. Across the board, I heard a clear message that youth counts matter.

This day of unprecedented attention to the need to end youth homelessness was inspiring but came with a sober recognition that we have a good way to go to meet our goal. The importance of better data regarding youth—upon which an adequate plan is to be built—was a recurring theme throughout the day. From Senator Dianne Feinstein's remarks to statements by Jennifer Ho of HUD and USICH Executive Director Matthew Doherty, there was a consistent recognition during both events that current counts underestimate the actual scope of youth homelessness.

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05/11/2015 - Ending Youth Homelessness

By Luke Tate

No young person should lack a stable and safe home, or be without a caring adult they can count on. Too many of America’s youth have been robbed of that essential foundation — and thanks to the extraordinary work of practitioners and volunteers across the country, we are learning what it takes to reestablish that footing and end youth homelessness nationwide.

In 2012, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) issued the Framework to End Youth Homelessness detailing the steps necessary to achieve the goal of ending youth homelessness by 2020, and strategies to improve outcomes for children and youth experiencing homelessness. This framework articulates the need for government, non-profit, civic, and faith community partners to focus together on the overall well-being of youth experiencing homelessness — addressing not just their need for stable housing, but also their educational and employment goals, and the importance of permanent adult connections in their lives.

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04/23/2015 - Federal Partners Move Forward on HMIS Alignment & Integration, Announce MOU on Roles & Responsibilities

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Community Planning and Development, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs’ Veteran Health Administration have recently announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that sets forth shared understanding of each agency’s respective roles and responsibilities regarding the use of Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS).

We know that using data to make smart decisions drives improvement in results. The more effectively we can collect, analyze, share, and coordinate around a common set of data, the more effectively we can inform action to end homelessness. For most communities, Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) are the primary data systems to capture information about families, youth, and individuals experiencing homelessness as well as information about the provision of housing and services to homeless individuals and families and persons at risk of homelessness.

HMIS helps us not only understand the impact our programs are having, it helps us better understand who our programs are engaging and how effective that engagement is. Action is underway now at the Federal level to integrate and align HMIS across Federal programs, which will help break down silos between services and programs and improve the effectiveness of our services and programs.

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04/16/2015 - The Time to Seize Historic Opportunities is Now - A Message from Matthew Doherty, USICH Executive Director

By Matthew Doherty, Executive Director

It is truly an honor to have this opportunity to serve as Executive Director of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) and to help carry forward the great work of this agency and of my predecessors. It is also a distinct privilege to work with the fantastic team of staff we have at USICH, both the team working here in DC and our Regional Coordinators working out in the field. Finally, I am humbled by the many sacrifices that my husband, Dean Thorp, is making so that I can step into this role.

USICH’s work is successful because of our strong partnerships with other Federal agencies and their incredibly committed leaders and staff, and because of the collaborative efforts of dedicated people working in states and local communities. Together, we are at a critical point in our efforts to prevent and end homelessness in the United States; we’ve made unprecedented progress and can point to substantial accomplishments under all of the objectives within Opening Doors, but clearly there remains much more work to be done. While we have seen significant reductions in the numbers of people experiencing homelessness documented through the annual Point-in-Time (PIT) count, the fact that the 2014 PIT count identified 578,424 people experiencing the crisis of homelessness, and other data such as from HUD’s Worst Case Housing Needs report, serve as a staunch reminder that housing affordability, housing instability, and homelessness continue to be national challenges—challenges that we must and can successfully address. 

As described in Opening Doors, our focus is on ending homelessness for all populations, and we must seize this historic opportunity to expand housing for every child, youth, family, and individual struggling to achieve stability within our communities.

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03/25/2015 - Ending Youth Homelessness in Connecticut

By Stacey Violante Cote

If you have wondered why the goal to end youth homelessness is set for 2022 while our goals to end Veteran and chronic homelessness are set for 2015 and 2016 respectively, you’re in good company. Youth homelessness is an urgent problem with lots of costly outcomes. Addressing this is also a preventative measure to stem the tide of chronic homelessness. So why set the goal so far down the road? It’s because this population has been invisible for a long time. As a result, we haven’t had enough data and research to determine the way out. It wasn’t until 2012 that the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) amended the federal plan, Opening Doors, to create a framework for ending youth homelessness. And now, Connecticut has its own statewide plan – Opening Doors-CT.

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03/19/2015 - Count Us In – A Look at Youth Counts in Seattle and Portland

By Katy Miller

In cities across the country there was great energy and collaboration around strengthening the count of youth experiencing homelessness as part of the 2015 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Point-in-Time (PIT) count. From Miami to Seattle, providers created new partnerships and shared innovative methods to get to a better count. This was driven by a deep desire to generate more accurate demographic data of youth and young adults experiencing homelessness and ultimately to target resources towards interventions that are the most effective for the population.

Recognizing that youth are undercounted in the homeless street count that typically happens in the middle of the night, youth providers partnered with their local Continuum of Care (CoC) leads to expand the hours for when young people can be counted. Since most youth have hunkered down and are hidden away to stay safe by the time the street count starts, concerted efforts to conduct outreach to the youth and young adults prior to the count was key. Many communities also expanded survey questions to help get to a better understanding of where young people are staying, how long they have been experiencing homelessness, and what their unique needs and characteristics are.

While only those youth that are sleeping outside on the night of the unsheltered count are reported to HUD, expanding outreach to young people that may be staying night to night with friends and family helps providers and planners get a better picture of the youth that are in and out of shelters and frequent drop-in centers and meal programs during the day.

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03/12/2015 - After Finals and During Breaks Throughout the Year, Foster Youth Students Face a Much More Difficult Test

This post was originally published on the U.S. Department of Education blog, Homeroom, in December 2014 under the title ‘After Finals, Foster Youth Students Face a Much More Difficult Test’. We have modified some language.

By Annie Blackledge & Johan Uvin

While many college students eagerly await spring break, planning beach getaways or trips home to see family and friends, many homeless and foster care students find themselves scrambling for somewhere to live until classes resume. Many college campuses traditionally close down for breaks. For these vulnerable students their college campus is their home, their community and a primary source of security. While their peers are headed on vacations or home to see family and catch up with old friends, many of these young people are faced with bleak prospects of where to go while school is closed.

These vulnerable youth face the same struggles as other young people trying to maintain good grades, navigating social peer groups, and planning their futures, but they face the additional burdens associated with little to no adult guidance or support. Fortunately, higher education professionals across our nation have begun to tackle the unique issues faced by homeless and foster care students. They are developing comprehensive strategies to address the most persistent barriers these students face; not just during the holiday season, but all year long.

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02/26/2015 - Preventing and Ending LGBTQ Youth Homelessness:  HUD Issues Historic Guidance and Launches First of Its Kind Effort with True Colors Fund

By Diane Kean and Mary Owens

In each of our cities and towns, every night, there are young people who face the unimaginable risk of exploitation, of abuse, of countless traumas that threaten not only their immediate health and well-being but that can inflict long-term damage. And the up-to 40 percent of youth who experience homelessness who identify as  Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) are at an even greater risk for depression, physical abuse, suicide, and substance use. Tragically, these atrocities aren’t confined to the streets; the majority of youth who identify as LGBTQ report harassment, physical abuse, or sexual assault when trying to access homeless shelters and services.  In a recent study, the Urban Institute found that many LGBTQ youth experiencing homelessness engage in ‘survival sex’ in order to have a roof over their heads or  obtain food to eat, rather than risk potential violence or abuse they might face in a shelter. We must do better for our young people.

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02/20/2015 - #NAEH15

By Diane Kean

The National Conference on Ending Family and Youth Homelessness is underway. We've captured some of the coversations, key moments, and insights. Here are some of the highlights!

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02/17/2015 - #NAEH15 Begins Tomorrow

2015 National Conference on Ending Family and Youth Homelessness

By Diane Kean

Tomorrow, the National Alliance to End Homelessness kicks off the National Conference on Ending Family and Youth Homelessness in San Diego, California. The conference provides a forum of learning and sharing for hundreds of policymakers, practitioners, and federal, local and private partners, all working to end family and youth homelessness. Workshops will focus around three learning tracks on Rapid Re-Housing, Youth, and Systems, and cover topics including family intervention, crisis response systems and coordinated entry process. Keynote speakers include Nan Roman, President and CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness, Toni Atkins, Speaker of the Assembly, California State Assembly, and Secretary Julián Castro, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

USICH is looking forward to attending and participating in the conference. Below is a list of the workshops where USICH staff will be presenting or moderating sessions during the conference. 

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